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Works

Walks With Walser, by Carl Seelig

After a nervous breakdown in 1929, Robert Walser spent the remaining twenty-seven years of his life in mental asylums. In 1936, Carl Seelig — an admirer who became Walser's friend and eventually his literary executor—began accompanying the great Swiss writer on his daily walks. As they strolled, Walser told stories, shared his daily experiences of the sanatorium, and expressed his opinions about books and art, writing and history. Filled with lively anecdotes and details, Walks with Walser offers the fullest available account of this wonderful writer's inner and outer life.

This Place Holds No Fear, by Monika Held

In clear, unobtrusive prose inspired by interviews Monika Held did with Auschwitz survivors, This Place Holds No Fear paints an emotive picture of life and love governed by trauma. Heiner’s suffering is omnipresent, and Lena’s struggle to hold her own in an imbalanced relationship dominated by his past is deeply moving. His stories are horrific and disturbing, but he cannot survive without them. Slowly, as the years pass, they’re able to a find freedom and a sense of peace they have not known before.

Glass! Love!! Perpetual Motion!!!: A Paul Scheerbart Reader

German writer, critic, and theorist Paul Scheerbart (1863-1915) is considered by some a mad eccentric and by others a visionary political thinker, but his influence is still felt today. Along with his influential treatise "Glass Architecture" (1914) and his story "Perpetual Motion: The Story of an Invention" (1910), a selection of his experiments with the short story form appear here for the first time.

Shorter Days, by Anna Katharina Hahn

It’s fall in Stuttgart, just before Halloween, and thirty-something mothers Judith and Leonie are safely ensconced in their upscale apartments in one of the city’s best neighborhoods. Judith has squeezed her life into the straitjackets of stay-at-home Waldorf motherhood—no TV, no sweets, nature hikes, and, above all, routine—and marriage to staid university professor Klaus. Leonie is proud of her work at a bank and her husband Simon’s career, though she worries that she’s neglecting her young daughters, and that Simon’s work distracts him from his family. Over the course of a few days, Judith and Leonie’s apparently stable, successful lives are thrown into turmoil by the secrets they keep, the pressures they’ve been keeping at bay, and the waves of change lapping at the peaceful shores of their existence.

This Beautiful Place, by Tankred Dorst

Despite its great importance and influence on German theater and letters, Dorst's work is still relatively unknown in America. This is particularly ironic given the strong influence of American culture, not to mention the country itself, on both his writing and personal history. At the age of 17, Dorst was conscripted into the German army but was soon captured and sent to an internment camp up the Hudson River. There, he became fascinated by American culture, which has continued to influence his work, particularly the episodic film style of directors like Robert Altman, so American readers have a chance to experience American culture through German eyes. His work has also been linked to such writers a Ionesco, Beckett and Giraudoux. This Beautiful Place is Dorst's only novella and the only work of his currently available in English."